Booking now open for Musica Secreta’s 2019 summer school

We would like to invite you to join us this summer in the extraordinary medieval town of Triora, high up in the Ligurian mountains, for a week of convent polyphony.  From 7-14 July, we will be singing, eating, and laughing together, and we’d love to have you there, too.  More information on this page, where … Read more

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Women and Music in Sixteenth-Century Ferrara a finalist in PROSE awards 2019

Laurie’s book, Women and Music in Sixteenth-Century Ferrara is named in the 2019 finalists’ list for the Association of American Publishers Awards for Professional and Scholarly Excellence (PROSE awards) for books of extraordinary merit that make a significant contribution to a field of study.  We are delighted that women’s music – particularly women’s polyphony – is finally getting recognition!

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Autumn news round-up!

Before the Christmas season gets underway, we thought we’d round up our autumn news and give you a few reminders about what’s coming up in 2019. September’s big news was the long-awaited release of Women and Music in Sixteenth-Century Ferrara. The book tells the story of Ferrarese music in a new way, by putting women … Read more

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Anthony (Tony) Newcomb: an appreciation

We are so sad this evening to hear the news of Tony Newcomb’s passing. His book, The Madrigal at Ferrara, 1579-1597, was our go-to reference for many years and the inspiration for the projects that led to recordings, concerts, and research of our own. His meticulous readings of documents, his insightful analysis that only could come … Read more

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Celebrating the creativity of Florence’s convents

Musica Secreta has, over the past few decades, done concerts in England, Ireland, Germany, France, Croatia, in cathedrals, decommissioned churches, hotel restaurants, and once memorably in a tent in a field. But we have never performed in Italy before, so Wednesday night was a wonderful first for us. Thanks to an enterprising invitation from Linda … Read more

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Who’s the daddy?

As usual, it’s all very busy here at Musica Secreta central, what with performances and workshops being planned, oh and books being published… Well, one book in particular, Women and Music in Sixteenth-Century Ferrara, which is finally out and available from Cambridge University Press, or Hive (other online retailers are available). While I was putting together all the final materials … Read more

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Musica secreta – read all about it!

It feels like a lifetime since I began to write this book but it’s only been, what, nineteen years? Oh, and only four hundred years since the last duchess of Ferrara died in 1618. And finally, finally it is done and coming out in print – on 27 September 2018. More or less everything we have done with Musica Secreta and Celestial Sirens in the last two decades has been part of the research process that has informed this tome – from the Dangerous Graces project and CD to Lucrezia Borgia’s Daughter, and all concerts, events, and shenanigans in between.  

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Back from clausura

Give us a hug, then, and welcome back!

Well, that didn’t quite go to plan. I notice that it has been almost exactly a year since the last update on the Musica Secreta blog, for which I apologise.

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Lucrezia Borgia’s Daughter scores available

Well, friends, finally I can start making the scores from the recording available as PDFs.  It’s not quite as I would want it: despite our best intentions, we are having to operate with human intervention rather than making them downloadable through the shop, at the moment.  Which means lots of manual work for me. But … Read more

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Thank you!!

Just. Blown. Away. by the reaction to the Guardian piece this morning. 1000+ shares already and still climbing! Laurie here – wanting to say to anyone finding us here to ask about articles, scores etc. that it’s all in train. Peer-reviewed article in December, and editions as soon as we can get them in good … Read more

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Come and sing convent polyphony with us!

We are very pleased that this year Triora Musica will again be hosting a week-long course for experienced female singers – high sopranos to low tenors! – looking at convent polyphony from the late fifteenth and early sixteenth centuries, including works by Josquin des Prez and anonymous motets from convent manuscript sources. Come and sing with … Read more

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